Genetic variants associated with subjective well-being, depressive symptoms, and neuroticism identified through genome-wide analyses

Okbay, A and Mills, Melinda (2016) Genetic variants associated with subjective well-being, depressive symptoms, and neuroticism identified through genome-wide analyses. Nature Genetics, 48 (6). pp. 624-638. ISSN 1546-1718

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Abstract

Very few genetic variants have been associated with depression and neuroticism, likely because of limitations on sample size in previous studies. Subjective well-being, a phenotype that is genetically correlated with both of these traits, has not yet been studied with genome-wide data. We conducted genome-wide association studies of three phenotypes: subjective well-being (n = 298,420), depressive symptoms (n = 161,460), and neuroticism (n = 170,911). We identify 3 variants associated with subjective well-being, 2 variants associated with depressive symptoms, and 11 variants associated with neuroticism, including 2 inversion polymorphisms. The two loci associated with depressive symptoms replicate in an independent depression sample. Joint analyses that exploit the high genetic correlations between the phenotypes (|ˆ |≈ 0.8) strengthen the overall credibility of the findings and allow us to identify additional variants. Across our phenotypes, loci regulating expression in central nervous system and adrenal or pancreas tissues are strongly enriched for association.

Item Type:Article
Subjects:1. Frameworks for Research and Research Designs > 1.10 Quasi-Experimental Research
1. Frameworks for Research and Research Designs > 1.18 Meta-Analysis
5. Quantitative Data Handling and Data Analysis > 5.5 Regression Methods
ID Code:4064
Deposited By: NCRM users
Deposited On:06 Dec 2017 16:13
Last Modified:09 Mar 2018 16:56

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